I love to write, but can I blog?

I love to write, but can I blog?

Posted in Blog, Farm Weddings

I have never had trouble writing, in fact, some say I have a knack for putting a spin on things.  I am a teacher by day and through the years have written lots and lots of opinion-based essays and commentaries concerning a variety of subjects–anything from critiquing our local newspaper which doesn’t give our school fair coverage, especially when compared to the city schools,  or writing about the groups and cliques of our student population. I have been asked to write countless letters of reference for college-bound students (one of which I just remembered I needed to get done today), and helped several of my teaching peers with their portfolios.   I’ve often thought I could write a book about projects that my students have done for competition in our DECA group.  But to blog–to try to be a blogger?  I am a little bit daunted at the challenge.  Sure, I like to talk and I love to brag about my business.  I guess I could start out by doing that.  But, I’m told that to be a great wedding blogger, I really shouldn’t brag about my beautiful and awesome event venue, but to offer advice and wisdom to potential brides and clients.  I cannot, however, state that I am the local expert on giving advice about planning a wedding.  You see, I have three sons, all of which got married on our family farm at Sampson’s Hollow.  Each wedding was gorgeous and each wedding represented different seasons of the year in the beautiful mist of the Great Smoky Mountains.  However, I digress.  I have three sons–no daughters.  So, here in the south, traditionally the responsibility for planning a wedding is that of the bride and her family.  It is something that she has looked forward to and planned for most of her life.  Many young ladies have a wish book that they might have started as tweeners and they dream and search through magazines and cut and paste photos (before the days of Pinterest), in order to create a play by play journal of what their perfect fairy tale wedding will be like.  I, as the mother of the groom, really had no part in the planning.  Oh, to be gracious, each of my future daughter-in-laws asked me my opinion–but other then I was supposed to wear a beige dress and provide the rehearsal dinner, that’s about all that I was asked to take care of.  I have, however, gained a wealth of wedding wisdom in living vicariously through the hundreds of young ladies who have honored our family and farm by choosing Sampson’s Hollow, as their venue of choice.  It’s been amazing.  I remember our first bride who visited our property while we under construction, and all she could see, were the blueprints and the acre of dirt that had been excavated in the process.  She listened as I described my vision, shared my dream and decided to take a chance.  My first bride.  That was almost ten years ago.  She has three children now.  When she told me she was expecting her first bay, I almost felt like I was having a grandchild.  We consider our brides to be family.  And that’s our approach to southern hospitality and the charm of a vintage farm wedding.  In my effort to be an effective blogger, I am always going to try to speak from the heart.  For it is through the heart that we hope that our visitors and potential brides will fall in love with our century-old farm in the hollow of the most beautiful Appalachian mountain range in East Tennessee.   Blog you later!  Janice